Best Dim Sum

Discussion in 'Food and Wine' started by Justin Thyme, Jun 3, 2006.

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  1. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    Pings is on Queens Blvd in Elmhurst. It's good but it has a vastly different cuisine than the one downtown.

    There's no good dimsum to be found in Queens. A few places along Broadway and some up in Flushing but nothing special.
  2. Lascivious

    Lascivious

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    Hey, that's a great dim sum dish. :D
  3. Monk

    Monk

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    Many years ago, a friend of mine and her lover would visit a different Chinatown restaurant every week. As you pointed out, many of these restaurants have an English menu for non-Chinese patrons and a Chinese menu for Chinese patrons. In addition, they often have specials taped to the wall written only in Chinese characters. My friend would routinely order one of these specials, having no idea what she would get, just to be adventurous. Needless to say, she ate some "interesting" meals. I think that's how she developed a taste for chicken feet, among other things.
  4. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    By the ways, the handle I use elsewhere on MERB and other boards ("EagerBeaver") was rejected by UG when I tried to register it. So I went with a variation of the same name, adding something from my diploma.
  5. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    JD=Juris Doctor. That's what it says on the diploma they gave me.
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
  6. Slinky Bender

    Slinky Bender The All Powerful Moderator

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    I'm not a doctor, but I play one on UG.
  7. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    Monk-

    It may have been around 2000 or 2001 that I did that research, or it may have been later. I guessed at 10 years. Needless to say, I don't note in my calendar the dates on which I do Internet research on dim sum. But I want to say it was at least 7 years ago that I started going to Ping's based on that research.

    I have also been to the other places in that neighborhood and I am myself an attorney. I can recall during a day long mediation in the federal court during the mid 1990s (between 1995 and 1998 for sure, because that is when I worked at the firm in question, and the federal court I don't think had yet moved to Pearl Street) going to a basement level restaurant on Mott Street. My client, one other attorney at my firm and I ate lunch at that restaurant and the tab for the 3 of us came to $17, including tax. I was stunned at the bill, and thought it was a joke. The food we ate was superb, and served in huge portions (combo lunches).

    I don't recall the name of the place or whether it is still there, but I do recall something very funny that happened there. They had an "authentic menu" for Asian customers and an "Americanized menu" for Caucasians containing the usual assortment of combo lunches with fried rice, soup and egg rolls. The three of us, including my client, are all Caucasians. Someone had left the "authentic menu" at our table, and my client innocently picked it up, reviewed it (it was in English and Chinese), and was intrigued by a dish on the menu. As I recall, it was a "salted pork" dish of some kind. The waiter, who barely could speak English and probably had not been in the USA very long, came over and attempted to take the menu away from my client. My client said, " I would like to order this dish" (pointing to the salted pork dish which so intrigued him). The waiter then said to him in a slightly excited voice, "no! no! this menu for Chinese people!!!!!!!!!!!!!!" My client, who was and is an impeccably polite man, said to the waiter, "I understand that. But I would like to order this dish." The waiter again told him the food was "for Chinese people." My client insisted he wanted to try it, even if it was made for Chinese people only. The waiter relented and placed the order. I tried some of my client's dish at his request and from what I recall, it was like a salted pork with peas. Nothing special in my view, but my client liked it. I got shrimp with lobster sauce and fried rice which is what I usually get in these kinds of places. Now I prefer to stick to dim sum.
  8. Monk

    Monk

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    Ping was originally the chef at a dim sum restaurant under the Manhattan Bridge that became very popular. Then he opened up a his own place on East Broadway and got rave reviews, so he moved it to Mott Street. I could be wrong, but I don't think he's been on Mott for more than 10 years, if that.

    BTW, he also has a place in Queens.

    There are a number of Chinatown restaurants popular with attorneys who work in the neighborhood. They're relatively cheap, some of them are quite good, and they're convenient to the courts, so it makes sense.
  9. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    You are probably right, but I have been to Ping's many times, always for lunch, and I have seen many attorneys there and even heard them discussing their cases. I am sure the owners know who most of their regular customers are.

    In fact, on the few occasions when I have had to go to the state or federal court on or near Foley Square, I have walked over to Ping's for lunch. Although I originally learned about Ping's by doing an Internet search on the best dim sum places in NYC, probably about 10 or more years ago.
  10. justlooking

    justlooking

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    And unlike most places in Chinatown, which have anonymous chefs, Ping's has a "name" chef.
  11. Monk

    Monk

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    Since Dim Sum is pretty inexpensive to begin with, the price differential isn't too great. You'll spend a little more there, but the quality makes it worthwhile.

    Why is it more expensive? Mott Street rents are higher, for one thing. They're also trying to be a little more upscale than some of the other Dim Sum places, which is reflected in the decor and the uniforms they make all the staff wear. They're also one or two doors down from the Peking Duck House, which is also pricier and more touristy than other Chinatown restaurants.
  12. justlooking

    justlooking

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    (I had a really great non-dim sum dinner there a few weeks ago, BTW.)
  13. justlooking

    justlooking

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    Inside Joke

    It takes a lot of guts to seriously discuss Ping's on a whoreboard.
  14. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    Ping's

    Lascivious,

    I think the reason that Ping's is a little pricier than other places in Chinatown is that they are located at 22 Mott which is a bit closer to Foley Square (where all the Courts are), and as a result many attorneys and other court personnel, who have more money to spend on lunch than your average Chinatown customer, are customers at Ping's. I have seen a lot more professional looking types in suits at a Ping's than I have at other places like Jing Fong on Elizabeth Street. It's because Ping's is a shorter walk from the Courts. Ping's also has a slightly more upscale ambience so they know they are going to attract that slightly more sophisticated dim sum customer.

    Even allowing for that price differential, I would still hold Ping's as my #1 choice in Chinatown for dim sum.
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  15. Lascivious

    Lascivious

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    I was there over the weekend. They have the best dim sum taste wise in Chinatown imho. Maybe a little pricier than other shops but well worth it.
  16. Lascivious

    Lascivious

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    I bought some big buns over the weekend there. It's a little smaller than before and they raised the price a little but still pretty good. I miss the old dingy look. It reminded me of a Chinatown that's now forever gone.
  17. Samuking

    Samuking

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    Yeah, I passed by the place, but they raised their prices now...
  18. humsuplo

    humsuplo

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    Are the old timers still working the counter? I've walked by and I don't see any of them. It wouldn't be the same without them there bitching and yelling in Toisan.
  19. DaiDaiLun

    DaiDaiLun

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    Mei Lai Wah on Bayard st is back in business. The place actually looks clean with a younger staff. I guess it's new ownership...I wonder if their Pork Buns are still good.
  20. DoctorBeaver

    DoctorBeaver

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    Monk,

    Thanks for the correction. I am from Connecticut, and here when we say NYC it usually means Manhattan. But I meant Manhattan in the post you have quoted.
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2008