Democrat on ethics panel faces allegations

Discussion in 'Politics and Religion' started by Lou Grant, Apr 21, 2006.

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  1. seeker6591

    seeker6591 banned

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    no surprise here
  2. oddfellow4870

    oddfellow4870

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    Political axioms from the village idiot:

    Incumbents win elections the majority of the time

    Incumbency and its length increases the opportunity for corruption

    Term limits decrease corruption

    Term limits decrease the likelihood of maintaining power

    I hold these axioms to be self evident and that they hold true regardless of which party is in power. Ethical politics is a challenge to human nature. It can be done, but is only easy for the politician who is ineffective and without ambition.
  3. seeker6591

    seeker6591 banned

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    Term Limits

    Now, More Than Ever !!!
  4. njman2

    njman2

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    alternately, with term limits, you don't have to worry about maintaining your name etc. Dip into the cookie jar as much as possible - or better yet - set yourself up nicely for a post congress career.
  5. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    But after six or 12 years on Capitol Hill, they say they're just getting the hang of the job


    Translation.....

    It takes between 6 to 12 years on capital hill before they aquire enough power to steal.




    Anyone ever see the 'The Distinguished Gentlemen' w/Eddie Murphy.... That movie couldn't be closer to the truth than the truth itself.
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2006
  6. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    More examples of Rethuglician lies and bullshit.

    WASHINGTON — Jeff Flake pledged during his first campaign for Congress in 2000 that if elected, he would serve three two-year terms. But the Arizona Republican is running again to keep his seat in the House of Representatives.

    "It was a mistake to limit my own terms," says Flake, a conservative who has challenged Republican leaders on federal spending. He says the once-fashionable movement to limit terms in Congress has "just petered out."

    Flake is one of at least seven House Republicans who had vowed to leave Congress next year but will be on the ballot in November. They ran as citizen legislators — antidotes for "career politicians." But after six or 12 years on Capitol Hill, they say they're just getting the hang of the job. Thats one hell of a learning curve None faces serious opposition because redistricting has protected incumbents.

    How things have changed since 1994. That year, self-described Republican revolutionaries ran on a "Contract with America" that promoted a constitutional amendment limiting terms for members of Congress. Republican George Nethercutt, for example, defeated then-House speaker Tom Foley partly by pledging to serve only three terms. He helped end 40 years of Democratic rule in the House.

    Nethercutt's decision to run for a fourth term became an issue in his 2000 campaign, but Washington state voters re-elected him.

    Term limits eventually stalled in Congress. Once Republicans took charge, "a lot of the motivation disappeared" to stick to them, says John Pitney, a former House Republican aide who teaches political science at Claremont McKenna College near Los Angeles.

    The Supreme Court ruled in 1995 that it was unconstitutional for states to limit the terms of their members of Congress. That decision invalidated laws in more than 20 states.

    [snip]

    Source http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-04-12-term-limits_x.htm
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2006
  7. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    Indeed, a great self described Conservative Republican Congressmen. So great in fact theres this editioral piece on him from the local paper.

    From http://www.vvdailypress.com/2006/114502175524735.html

    Conservatives everywhere, including on this page, bemoan what has become the tax-and-spend posture increasingly assumed by the Republican majority in Congress. The record-setting deficits being rung up by budget-busting Republicans bids fair to turn that majority into a minority come November.

    That's because, so the theory goes, conservative voters won't turn out to vote, so disgusted have they become with the people whom they elected precisely to trim the size of government. No argument there.

    That won't affect Rep. Jerry Lewis, of course, who in November will be seeking his 15th term as the representative of either all or part of the Victor Valley. He has rarely gotten less than 65 percent of the vote in the first 14 campaigns (last time around, his only opponent was a Libertarian; Democrats didn't bother to field a candidate) and likely won't get much less than that in November.

    But if the Wall Street Journal is to be believed, Jerry Lewis will be directly responsible for turning the Republican majority in the House of Representatives into a Republican minority after the votes are counted. That's because Congressman Lewis is the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, and as such wields tremendous influence in approving spending by the federal government. As we said, that spending under the Congressman's watch has exploded. The Journal blames Lewis for the explosion.

    The Journal's lead editorial Thursday was headlined, "The minority maker," and in a blistering denunciation of the Congressman and his fellow 13 members of the House Appropriations Committee (He's the chairman), said that what was notable about Lewis's refusal to go along with a group of fiscally conservative Members who wanted to impose some spending discipline on the House was, "the utter cluelessness by Mr. Lewis and his friends about how much trouble they're in and how to get out of it."

    The Journal also noted that when President Bush recently asked Congress to pass some sort of line-item veto, Congressman Lewis was among the first to complain, saying such a move "could be a very serious error."

    The Journal's analysis of that attitude? "Mr. Lewis is opposed to any budget reform that would give the President more leverage to limit (Mr. Lewis's) ability to spend tax dollars like there's no tomorrow," it said.

    Jerry Lewis has long represented himself as a Conservative Republican, to the right on various and sundry societal issues. For instance, he led the way in trying to preserve the Mojave Cross, the memorial to fallen veterans of World War I erected in the desert several decades back. He thinks the Iraq war is a "just war," is against a government controlled health-care program, and generally comes down on the side of the private sector when it tries to resist government intervention.

    Yet, as the Journal says, since he was defeated by Dick Armey back in 1992 for the Chairman of the GOP Conference, Lewis has, "hunkered down as one of the GOP's spenders-in-chief, presiding over multiplying earmarks and chopping to bits the party's reputation as fiscal conservatives."

    Tomorrow is April 15, and the Internal Revenue Service will set a new record high in the amount of money America's taxpapers send to Washington, D.C. But it won't be enough to fund the federal government and satisfy the big spenders. If the Journal is to be believed, Jerry Lewis bears more responsibility for that shortfall than any Democrat.

    Steve Williams

    At least hes not Duke Cunningham.
  8. Hyabby

    Hyabby Guest

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    Double Ditto!

    Just look at Rep. Jerry Lewis (Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee) - the biggest threat to Republican control from their own side of the aisle - no doubt justbill_redux loves the man. 14 friggin' terms - and he'e never met an appropriation he didn't like.
  9. oddfellow4870

    oddfellow4870

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    Ditto
  10. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    Demacrook... bwahahahaha.

    12 terms?

    Yet another example of how badly this country needs term limits in congress. Two, maybe three terms and get the fuck out. Beyond that they make too many friends, get to complacent and start to steal.
  11. Lou Grant

    Lou Grant

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    1,439
    What's the left equivalent to Bill's rethuglican? A Demacrook?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12425717/

    WASHINGTON - Rep. Alan B. Mollohan (W.Va.) stepped down temporarily from his post as ranking Democrat on the House ethics committee, amid accusations that he used his congressional position to funnel money to his own home-state foundations, possibly enriching himself in the process.

    As recently as Thursday, Mollohan, a 12-term lawmaker, said he would not step aside, but he bowed to pressure yesterday from House Democratic leaders eager to pursue their campaign against what they call a "culture of corruption" in the Republican Party.

    [snip]

    Sharp increase in personal wealth

    Mollohan's real estate holdings and other assets jumped in value from $562,000 in 2000 to at least $6.3 million in 2004, said Ken Boehm, chairman of the legal center.

    During the same period, Mollohan used his position on the House Appropriations Committee to secure more than $150 million in appropriations for five nonprofit entities that he helped establish in his congressional district. One of the groups is headed by a former appropriations aide, Laura Kurtz Kuhns, with whom Mollohan bought $2 million worth of property on Bald Head Island, N.C.

    The congressman has steadfastly maintained that the surge in his personal worth came from an inheritance, some smart investments and a sharp run-up in real estate values, especially in Washington.