hey, guys

Discussion in 'General Industry Related Topics' started by K.S., Sep 28, 2001.

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  1. paladin

    paladin

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    134
    Good Luck!

    With this year nearing its end, I was thinking about you and your forthcoming service in the Navy. There has been much good advice from the other posters, and I won't duplicate that.

    I spent 6 years in the Navy and a major part of my 40 year career working for the military one way or another. I wish you well. It can be very rewarding if you can get past the stupid regulations and boredom. Most ships are staffed for warfare. That means that when you're not at General Quarters (which is most of the time) you literally will have nothing to do - except maybe for chipping paint or some other make-do tasks.

    I hope you will do as you say, strive to be the best in your class. You are very intelligent and smart. Get as much (free) schooling as you can. Since you already have a college degree, I suggest you seriously consider Officer Training (my nephew's wife is there right now). Being an officer is clearly a better route than being enlisted. Also, being an officer leads to more options as a civilian after you're done your tour.

    I pray that your tour will be safe and everything that you hope it will be. You deserve the best of luck.

    Whenever you are in Philly, please look me up for a good dinner and drinks.

    Bon Voyage
  2. Bill Furniture

    Bill Furniture Flounder

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    10,182
    I didn't see this until just now. Thanks justme! :)
  3. localguy

    localguy

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    Japan is horribly expensive, A lot of the sailors have trouble
    making ends meet.
  4. localguy

    localguy

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    92
    Try it out, but the mindlessness may bother you to no
    end. Stupid as corporate meetings are, you've never
    seen the foolishness of really large institutions.

    The man I hired as my boss, used to run a carrier. He's got
    some very funny perspectives on ship life.

    You are incredibly bright, that's usually not a virtue in the
    military.
  5. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    No, no, no. I was pointing out to Julie that H4C is a codger to everyone, not just her. I only have nice things to say. Just today I was saying that Bill Furniture seems like a nice guy.
  6. Bill Furniture

    Bill Furniture Flounder

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    10,182
    I'm not coming to any of your parties!
  7. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    9,573
    See, Julie, it's not just piss and vinegar for you... it's piss and vinegar for everyone!
  8. hot4chicks

    hot4chicks

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    You'll like the Navy then - lots of unambitious people there
  9. justlooking

    justlooking

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    When you contrast K.S.'s response to h4c with some of the other shit that's been going on here lately . . . . well, it's just too bad that they probably don't give you unmonitored internet access on aircraft carriers.
  10. K.S.

    K.S.

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    223
    hot4chicks:

    If you define "best career option" as "what makes you happy" then I don't really see the problem. I'm not particularly ambitious. I don't care about the money. I am sick, sick, sick of my job as an editor and I wish to escape the world of cubicles and stupid company meetings. (For the world of bulkheads and stupid drills, I guess.)

    I could do something else, I suppose, but nothing appeals to me the way the Navy does. Becoming an officer is still an option at some point in the future.

    Not all of my friends even went to college. I have a good friend who's a single mother with a GED (and that is one smart girl!)
  11. hot4chicks

    hot4chicks

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    Is it me, or does anyone else think that its wildly curious that if her best friends are MD/PhD level (not to mention the ones attending the most competitive schools in the country) that her best option/career choice was to become an enlistee in the Navy?
  12. Phantom

    Phantom

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    2,806
    Slinky,

    A suggestion,

    Give KS a honorary status level other then the bronze one she has.

    All those agree, say aye.
  13. Phantom

    Phantom

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    2,806
    K.S.

    First of all I would like to wish you the best in your new adventure, GIVE'EM HELL GIRL!

    Next, K, if you really think about it, can anybody who can't accept you for who you are, can they really be considered true friends?
  14. K.S.

    K.S.

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    Thanks, Fumpton.

    I guess I'll just wait to see what the other concientious and mature sailors like to do with free time. I expect to be older than most of the others, and there aren't that many women, so I don't know what my social life will be like.

    As for your friend in flight school, he or she is almost certainly an officer, and so we wouldn't be hanging out or frequenting the same places, anyway.

    I've never been to Florida (having once, as a child, vowed to never go there. You'd have to grow up on the trashy side of Cincinnati to understand why). I like that Pensacola is so close to Mississipi and Alabama. I've always wanted to explore the deep south, and I hope to maybe check that out on my weekends off (which, I believe, will happen at some point in A school.) One of my best friends is from Houston, and maybe she'll be able to come see me.

    Oh, and slinkybender, Wendy's not my one friend with a "straight" job - all of my friends have straight jobs (except Stacey, who is waitressing until she starts her MBA program.) My best friends are physicists, editors, law students, and artists. I have no friends from my days in the business (now that the Golden Gypsy has closed, I can't even reach old acquaintances to say "hi.")

    One thing I feel sorta weird about: I'll be losing caste by enlisting in the Navy. What I mean is, I'll be blue collar. I happen to think I'll enjoy being an aircraft electrician, but I do wonder how it will impact me socially. My friends will always be my friends, of course, but I wonder how people will perceive me. When I tell someone I'm an editor, they assume that I have a BA. They think I'm one of "them." Already, my physicist friend is kinda freaked out. He loves me and we'll always be friends, but he's just from an entirely different background. Everyone in his family is a doctor (MD or PhD) and they all went to Exetor, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, MIT, Harvard... he looks at me as if I'm discussing growing a second head when I tell him about going into the Navy. Also, as my mother was keen to point out, as enlisted, "you won't be able to date or marry any of the good guys (officers)." I have to admit to being a little taken aback by some of the other youngsters at MEPS. Even the videos they show you go on and on about how one can escape the projects/factory/dead end jobs and get a career in the Navy (and earn your associates degree!).

    See what a snob I am?
  15. fumpton

    fumpton

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    3,316
    K.S., let me know if you want to know where the best bars are or where's a good place to hang out during your off time.
  16. fumpton

    fumpton

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    3,316
    A good friend is stationed in Pensacola right now going to flight school.
  17. Slinky Bender

    Slinky Bender The All Powerful Moderator

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    You know, when the friend of yours with the "real job" is a DJ................. :).
  18. Geezy Muldoon

    Geezy Muldoon Gold

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    My wife had our two children at 33 and 38. My two grandmothers had my parents in their early 40s. Don't be in a rush. If its a father and/or husband you want, be as picky as you please. If its just a DNA donor, also feel free to take your time. Father was President of a Fortune 500 company. No ill effects at all from having an older mother. Such children can be quite vigourous.
  19. K.S.

    K.S.

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    223
    Thanks for all your nice comments!

    I just got back from a week's holiday in Rome, and I'm still jet-lagged (which is why I'm up at 5am).

    I figured you guys always sorta wonder what happens to the girls when they drop out of sight, which is one reason I keep you all informed.

    Anyway, I did go and swear in two Tuesdays ago. I got exactly the job I wanted- aviation electronics - and I'll be going to basic training in January. In the meantime, I will continue to edit bad medical prose and figure out what to do with all my stuff. Unlike the kids who enlisted alongside me, I've got the household of a 31-year-old (who used to make quite a bit of money). Some of it I will store, but most of it will be sold. I won't be living anywhere that needs furnishings for a couple of years, I'd say.

    My technical school will be in Pensacola, Fl. There are two paths in aviation avionics - one of which requires more schooling and seems to emphasize a basic knowlege of physics and problem-solving. I think that's the one for me. I will endeavor to graduate at the very top of my class, as the top students get their first choice in assignment. Hopefully, by the time we write our "wish list" of three assignments, I'll know which squadrons are the ones I'd like most. I think I'd like to go into the Pacific fleet, as I've never been to Asia. For example, the home port for the USS Kitty Hawk is in Japan. That could be cool (although the Kitty Hawk is now in the Indian Ocean, and probably not doing much fun, leisurely stuff).

    I do have a "cussed streak" as Judge Crater said, but I don't think that will be a problem. I think I'll know enough to be mature and get along.

    My trip to Rome was great. I went with a childhood friend. She's got a great career as a DJ back home, and she is about to buy a house. It seems like she is moving in a totally grown-up direction, while I'm still running around and doing things on a whim. I sometimes worry about growing old alone, but I am so glad I don't have any dependents right now. Funny thing is, she got married at 25, just like clockwork, and then had to divorce the jerk in a year. She now worries that, at age 31, she won't be able to have a big family. I feel kinda bad for women who have their hearts set on a certain procreative schedule. I think the sexual revolution and feminism have made it difficult for women to deal with the situation well. Everyone is used to being able to "play house" for a couple of years, then breaking up, and women are expected to put their careers first. One can NOT go on a date and make it clear that one of their goals is to have 3 children in six years. Unless, of course, the point is to get rid of some poor schmuck without hurting his feelings.

    OK, I'm rambling on. Sorry about that.

    xoxoKS
  20. Geezy Muldoon

    Geezy Muldoon Gold

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    2,351
    After speaking with my step-sister's husband* this weekend, further practical advice: Skip the officer track. Takes forever to become a captain. Work up through the ratings and obtain a high enlisted person's rank. You'll be an expert in whatever technical field you choose by that point. And have a decent pension and great marketable skills. Since you have talent at working with computers (great picture of the asshole - I've downloaded it and am now always conscious that that's how I really look to the women I pay for sex), maybe that's the ticket you might want to consider.

    Meta comment: Strange sight to witness all these hardened veterans of commercial cooze buying lining up to wish a hooker well. Since there can never be any real connection between us and you or any other woman we meet when we are thus engaged, perhaps this is our way of giving vent to the sneaking feeling that women such as you have been should be recognized for something else other than the value of their sexual services and temporary good looks. Old Life magazine instincts still at work even in us...Down at the local bordello...Barefoot boys with strings of fresh caught trout and fondness for the dark side...Gazing at little girls with flowers...

    Sly obnoxious comments: Aristotle out of the bullrushes! Oh, my. Mr. P having tender fantasies of being your swabby? Nah, wishes you well, I'm sure, and wishes he could be your swabby.

    *Retired from U.S. Army at highest enlisted person's rank. Great pension. Great job. And he's only in his late 50's. Downside. Three tours in Vietnam...Still gets anxious at sudden loud noises.