New Jersey's Corzine Should Consider Raising Taxes

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Al Kikuras, Jan 29, 2006.

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  1. RoosterC74

    RoosterC74

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    I think you are being a bit naive about it. Again, just my opinion. And you have to start somewhere. The answer to everything in the state or nation is not to just keep adding to the taxes.
  2. lamont5123

    lamont5123

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    There certainly is corruption.

    However, I doubt the amount paid to no-show employees is even 1/1000th of the funds needed to take care of our aged citizens
  3. RoosterC74

    RoosterC74

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    Yes and the number of govt. employees continues to go up and up and up. With no-show jobs, etc.
  4. lamont5123

    lamont5123

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    All states need to raise taxes because the population is getting older and money must be found to pay for medicare.

    And many school systems are underfunded, especially in states where there are a huge number of illegal immigrants.

    The only debate will be on what will be more heavily taxed.
  5. RoosterC74

    RoosterC74

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    Just cutting the pure waste and corruption found in NJ Govt. will help pay off the debt.
  6. Bandaid

    Bandaid

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    Corzine will find, as many politicians have but deny, that raising taxes will hurt the state's economy and further drive it down. There will be no avoiding pain in getting the state's finances on track.
  7. SlickWilly

    SlickWilly

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    Thanks for the info, Rooster. As a former New Yorker, I remember reading hearing things about past governors and political leaders borrowing on the future. Long Island's property taxes are just as out of whack, maybe even worse than here, if possible. How ironic that if one lives in Queens, Brooklyn or Staten Island, they pay the cheapest property taxes anywhere. Of course, no big backyards for anyone.
  8. RoosterC74

    RoosterC74

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    Slick-

    I am certainly not a fan of James McGreevey. However, if you really look into Jersey's Problems, it was created by more leaders than just James-I Am Gay-McGreevey. Christie Whitman borrowed huge sums of money from the Pension System, and thus, it has been out of whack ever since. And Florio was no more than a figure head for the Political Boses of Camden and Hudson Counties. I believe the last true good governor that we had was Tom Kean.
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2006
  9. RoosterC74

    RoosterC74

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    Take a simple look at property taxes, income taxes, etc. in N.J. and you will soon discover that it is one of the most expensive states to live in. Yes, our homes are worth far more than in most places. Yes, our salaries are significantly higher than most areas. And most certainly, more political corruption, fraud, etc. exist in NJ than almost any other state.

    Simply put Jon Corzine was put into office by the Political Boses of the Democratic Party, and thus, he will continue to do business in Jersey, as it has been done for many moons. Taxes will go up, and we are certainly quite use to it.
  10. SlickWilly

    SlickWilly

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    Typical politician. Never mentioned any of these things when he was running for governor. I'll bet there are some people out there ready to start an "Impeach Corzine" movement. New Jersey wouldn't be in such a mess if the previous administration hadn't ignored all the corruption that went on.
  11. Al Kikuras

    Al Kikuras

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    New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine's transition team is recommending he consider raising taxes to balance the state budget, according to a report distributed today by Republican state lawmakers.

    Corzine should consider a sales tax on clothing and for services including tanning, massage parlors and cable television, the report said. The Democrat, who took office Jan. 17, also should consider increasing the gasoline tax, laying off workers, cutting salaries and freezing hiring, the report says.

    Anthony Coley, Corzine's press secretary, said the report distributed by Republicans hasn't been submitted to the governor's office. Reports by groups that made policy recommendations to Corzine's transition team will be made public as early as tomorrow, Coley said.

    Corzine, a former U.S. senator and chief executive officer of Goldman, Sachs & Co., faces a state budget deficit of more than $5 billion in the next fiscal year, voter anger over the highest property taxes in the nation, and a lack of funding for school-construction and transportation projects.

    Budgets should ``be in true balance with recurring revenue sources equaling expenditures,'' the report said. ``If expanding the tax base and cutting expenditures cannot produce a balanced budget, then reluctantly, we recommend a temporary tax rate surcharge.''

    `Grave Consequences'

    The state has almost $30 billion of debt, and another $30 billion of unfunded liabilities in its retirement and health- care programs, according to the report. The programs ``need to be brought into line with the state's ability to pay, and with the trends in the private and public sectors,'' the report said.

    ``Failure to implement fundamental change will have grave consequences, including a further downgrading of the state's debt rating and therefore higher borrowing costs; skyrocketing property taxes due to a reduction in state aid and rebates; and reduced state services in order to pay for mandatory debt service, pensions, health care costs and more,'' the report said.

    Corzine should cut ``waste and pork' from the state budget, not raise taxes on items such as clothing, said Republican State Senator Anthony Bucco.

    ``In the past four years state government has increased taxes by more than $10 billion, debt by $17 billion and spending by 24.5 percent,'' Bucco said. ``It is inconceivable that Governor Corzine would even consider adding to this burden being shouldered by New Jersey's working families.''

    The transition report also recommends phasing out the pension system by offering all new state hires defined- contribution plans such as 401(k)s. New Jersey also should move all legislative and executive branch workers that aren't part of a collective bargaining agreement to a defined contribution plan immediately, the report says.

    Unpopular With Voters

    A majority of New Jersey voters would prefer the state cut services rather than raise taxes to reduce the budget deficit, a Quinnipiac University poll released today showed.

    Sixty-nine percent of voters polled by Quinnipiac opposed increasing the gasoline tax to finance roadwork and mass-transit projects. Corzine, 59, has said he won't rule out increasing the gas tax to raise money.

    ``Corzine obviously has his job cut out for him,'' Clay Richards, assistant director of Quinnipiac's poll, said in a statement. ``New Jersey voters know there is a serious budget problem facing the state, but at the same time are saying high taxes'' are the most serious of the state's problems, he said.

    The poll of 961 registered voters, conducted Jan. 18 to Jan. 23, has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percentage points.