Not Amused

Discussion in 'General Industry Related Topics' started by K.S., May 12, 2001.

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  1. Hotpuppy

    Hotpuppy Mr.Butterworth

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    Very observant wsb, just to extend this semantic exercise: it may be that "Scots" is the possesive form of Scot (a person from Scotland), so the distillers of Cutty Sark( which I wouldnt use as paint thinner) may be trying to give the impression that their beverage is the "Scots " choice. While "Scotch" is an adjective, a descriptive, a type of whisky produced solely in Scotland. Whatever. Now my head hurts and I havent even had a drink yet.
    take care HP
  2. wsb

    wsb

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    Just as a follow-up to my discussion w/ HP, I was at the pub last eveing and although I don't drink it myself, I noticed that Cutty Sark is labeled "Scots Whisky". At least someone got it correct.

    Cheers,

    WSB
  3. Candide

    Candide

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    Candie :) Touche!
  4. thelastone

    thelastone

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    Theres only one cure for a toothache. And I'm sure everyone here knows what it is...



    painkillers...

    why what were you thinking?
    ;)
  5. mercydancer

    mercydancer

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    Can it cure a toothache?
  6. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    i used it to clean paint brushes.
  7. HornDogBuddah

    HornDogBuddah

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    Say it ain't so.
  8. candie

    candie

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    So all that scotch I was given during the holidays that I used to clean my phones with was for drinking?
  9. jmp

    jmp

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    Last time I was in Vegas, I was walking past one of the bars at the Bellagio when I noticed their Scotch collection. I gamble enough there that they comp me all my drinks even when I'm not at the tables, so I sat down and pondered the selection for a little while, finally deciding to have the Macallan 25, which I don't get my hands on too often. (I don't drink while I'm gambling, as both require too much attention, especially when drinking good Scotch.)

    Based on the expression on my face when I saw the Scotch collection, and the way I handled the drink once I got it, the bartender made a comment about it being nice to have someone drinking the stuff who actually appreciated it. Apparently, she got lots of people around there who would ask for a Scotch list, then order the most expensive one on the rocks, or with soda. The thought of it nearly made me sick, but getting to sample all their selections for free over the course of my stay made up for it.
  10. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    With wine and spirits, I think the important thing is to slowly develop your palate. I agree that most people can't distinguish wines, but by and large that's because most people don't know what to look for. The thing is, though, that unless you're willing to devote sufficient amount of time and concentration to a quality beverage, it doen't really make any sense to drink it - may as well go for the cheap stuff. While in a whiskey bar once, I saw a guy take a shot of Springbank 21 and I wanted to walk over and smack him. I never understand people that order $100 dollar bottles of wine to go with lunch - it's just an insult to the wine. Still, if you're willing to put in the patience and effort, I think the differences become obvious*.

    * - to depart, a bit, from the thread... my favorite spirit (that I've tried, obviously) is Pierre Ferand's Abel. Now, the differnce between the Abel (45 years) and the Selection des Anges (30 years) is almost as big as that between the products of two different distilleries.
  11. mercydancer

    mercydancer

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    Re: Ummm Mercy....

    The only problem is that once I hit the 7th shot,(and I'm talking real sized shots not those miniature ones they serve in some of the downtown bars,)well I have to sit for a while because then I have a tendency to get TOO friendly and not notice that I'm doing it. Don't want to get accused of sexual harassment.
  12. beep9

    beep9

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    Now we can move this back to Whiskey. When in London, those who desire will find it profitable to hie to the Covent Gardent Whiskey Shop. Even at the distillery's I've not seen cask strength whiskey's for sale. These are whiskey's that are not blended at all (even single malt whiskeys are blended between barrells, and watered to an appropriate proof), and, as such, are a bit unpredictable. My favorite right now is a 25 year old Linkwood, aged in sherry, which is, unfortunately, no longer available (the cask ran out). According to the label, it is proof 127.8 (63.9% alcohol). Those who like the big peaty whiskeys wouldn't be overly impressed with this one, but that adds to the horse race.

    One other thing: as always, it's best to get someone else to pay for the trip to London:)
  13. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    there's also something called "barrel house" which is produced also once every few years. it can be bought in your local store and it's supposedly aged in the original barrels they used 150 years ago and aged longer. it's 96 or 98 proof as opposed to 90 that JD is usualy bottled at, unless you have green label which is 84 proof.
  14. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    it's in a crystal decanter with the jack daniels logo embossed on it. they make it once every few years or so(i think 1,000 bottles) and give it out to their top customers and sales people. i know someone who is a big shot for a major liquor store chain and he gave me two of them. every now and then you will see one in a buy rite or one of those chain stores.
  15. JohnJ

    JohnJ Repentant Sinner

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    Ummm Mercy....

    Me.... you... back of the bar at the get together.... doing shots of JD purely to test your theory as to which head it goes to....

    ;)

    John
  16. wsb

    wsb

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    Come on Oz, tell Mercy the truth. You make that sh*t in your back yard. Of course, it's not like anyone would know the difference though at 135 proof. Hope you own a fire extinguisher - sounds like dangerous stuff.

    whooowaaah,

    WSB

    [Edited by wsb on 05-21-2001 at 06:20 PM]
  17. Hotpuppy

    Hotpuppy Mr.Butterworth

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    Good ole Dr. Jack!
    Why in hell would anyone brag about Green label Jack? Id like to try some of that 135 sometime.
    Take care HP
  18. wsb

    wsb

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    Horndogbudda --

    Re: "Also, many knowledgeable folks will tell you that whisky does not get any mellower nor any more complex once it reaches the age of 15-18 years (depending upon distillers)."

    Well, that is certainly one commonly espoused opinion, but far from fact as far as I'm concerned.

    I am hardly an expert when it comes to whisky and I can absolutely discern the difference between 18 and 25 yr old whiskies from distillers with whom I am familiar. I also have some considerably older bottles from Macallan and other distillers that I think just about anyone could clearly determine taste different that their younger bretheren.

    You are absolutely correct though that whisky does not continue to age once it has left the cask.

    --WSB
  19. mercydancer

    mercydancer

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    oooh,yummy.135proof?hummmm. JD has a way of going straight to my head.But usually the downstairs one.
  20. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    15,725
    mercy,

    i've got some JD direct from the plant thats not available anywhere.....135 proof and it's colorless. taste the same though......maybe we should meet and toss back a few.

    oz :cool:..............who laughs at people who brag about having green label JD(it's not available in ny) when it's soo much weaker. and also available all over the south.