Outcall ripoff turns bad in Arizona:

Discussion in 'General Industry Related Topics' started by skagen, Nov 16, 2001.

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  1. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    Three Letter Acronym.
  2. ramstein

    ramstein

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  3. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    While it seems somewhat unlikely, I think I can imagine a situation in which a FS providor can be raped in session. Sexual assault has to do with a lack of will. Clearly, no providor -no matter how PSE/GFE/TLA- gives you free reign on her body.
  4. ramstein

    ramstein

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    660
    I mean if the girls were working for a escort agency and had a prior history of prostitution, would they have filed rape charges? Would that do harm to their reputation as providers. I mean, if you found out the a provider you are about to see accused a former client of rape, would you feel comfortable in seeing her? So why would these two girls accuse this guy of rape unless they really didn't offer FS and hence their reputation as providers could not be damaged by such a high profile case?
    I hope I clarified my earlier statement.
  5. ew

    ew Silver

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    Ditto.

    Huh?
  6. littleguy

    littleguy Gold

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  7. ramstein

    ramstein

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    660
    If the 2 girls who weren't working for a legit service would they have filed rape charges though?
  8. Bill Furniture

    Bill Furniture Flounder

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    You're damn right Bede!
  9. skagen

    skagen

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    I'm not sure that "security measures" are relevant here unless you're going to run Police Check on each and every customer. I don't know any aggency that does that. What they do is to get someone's identity but that is no guarantee that an incident won't happen when the two people are alone in the room.

    And then the incident most likely originated with the Agency/girl intiating a ripoff that they guy reacted to. So security measures or not, my point was that its ironic that the ripoff backfired so bady - with negative consequences for both the girl and the guy they were trying to ripoff.
  10. courtesan
     
    SYLLABICATION: cour·te·san
    PRONUNCIATION:   kôrt-zn
    NOUN: A woman prostitute, especially one whose clients are members of a royal court or men of high social standing.

    men of high social standing: that's us, right???
  11. K.S.

    K.S.

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    Bede: They're not courtesans. They're prostitutes.

    And, yes. They deserve some consideration when it comes to their personal safety.
  12. no shit. and yet some here question various providers security measures (which i can understand - i prefer anonymity myself). however, just like we do our research online (an informed consumer, etc...) don't our courtesans deserve likewise?
  13. skagen

    skagen

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    894
    I have no idea what was up with the bad check, but this portion of the article is a sad and familiar situation with outcalls:

    "The dancer arrived, but Ibeabuchi was apparently expecting a more intimate form entertainment than what the dancer was offering.

    Enraged, Ibeabuchi allegedly sexually assaulted the dancer.

    A little more than one month later, essentially the same crime happened, only this time the locale was Las Vegas' Treasure Island Hotel and Casino.

    A dancer was called for, she arrived, and Ibeabuchi and the dancer disputed the nature of her services. Ibeabuchi racked up his second alleged sexual assault case. "


    Those were classic outcall agency ripoffs. I suspect a lot of Johns have been ripped off like that. I certainly have. The girl takes your cash, insists its not full service and then refuses to return your cash. Who really spends hunderds of dollars to call a girl to their hotel room to watch them dance? Plus, the "out of towner" in a hotel room is the classic "mark' for this kind of ripoff.

    I used to travel a lot and this happened to me a coupel times in other cities. After the second time I got ripped off, I only used agencies that had positive reviews from a source that I could trust.

    Like most normal people, I wrote it off to experience and learned. Problem is: people with violent tendencies are unpredictable and he probably lost it.

    Sad story all round...
  14. Phantom

    Phantom

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    Last edited: Nov 16, 2001
  15. justme

    justme <i>pop and click tainted</i> Vinyl ( is dead )

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    Details are really lacking in this whole write-up.

    You're assuming the reporter would even begin to know what questions to ask and that the average reader could possible care.
  16. littleguy

    littleguy Gold

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    Gotta agree with K.S. on this one. nothing I read suggests to me it was an out and out ripoff. Having said that, the Phoenix area in particular is very well known for its rip-offs, cash and dash especially.

    If the gentleman was paying, say, $100 for an hour of "outcall dancing" (whatever that is), *I* would have know all I was getting was a dance. OTOH, being it's Arizona, he could have been paying $250 for an "outcall dancer". This being the case, perhaps he WAS being ripped-off.

    Details are really lacking in this whole write-up.
  17. K.S.

    K.S.

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    223
    Why do you assume this was a rip-off?

    If a client insists on paying with a check, and then gets violent, that's not a rip-off.

    And, the earlier "dancer" may have merely not been in agreement with what he wanted. Perhaps he demanded bareback greek for $100 or something ridiculous.

    The guy is schizo and has violence problems. Such clients do exist. The provider can have a problem with that sort of client without even attempting to rip him off.
  18. skagen

    skagen

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    894
    Sounds like this guy ended up in a ripoff situation and got mad....

    Boxer, facing life, opts for plea deal (sports related) Boxer, facing life, opts for plea deal
    By Matthew Gilbert and Stephen A. Lawrence, Court TV

    If it all had gone according to plan, Ikemefula "Ike" Ibeabuchi would have been in a Las Vegas courtroom Tuesday, taking a shot at being declared innocent of sexual assault charges against him.

    Instead, the undefeated heavyweight boxer sits in a jail cell, facing at least another 31 months behind bars after entering into a plea bargain agreement with prosecutors. It is a possible sad end to a once promising career.

    "Had he not wound up in jail, I think he would have been heavyweight champion of the world," said Max Kellerman, ESPN's boxing analyst.

    At 6 feet, 2 inches and 240 pounds, Nigeria-born Ibeabuchi used his vicious punching power against his opponents. Ibeabuchi turned pro in 1994, and rattled off 20 consecutive victories over the next five years. But the boxer, now 28, became as fearsome outside the ring as he was inside it.

    Less than three years after turning pro, Ibeabuchi found himself in front of a judge for the first time on charges that would establish his m.o.: rage brought on by an encounter with a woman.


    A former Texas Golden Gloves champion, Ibeabuchi pleaded guilty to kidnapping and false imprisonment charges there in 1997. Ibeabuchi smashed his car into a pillar while traveling about 70 mph. The passenger was the 15-year-old son of his estranged girlfriend. He was sentenced to three months.


    Released from prison in early 1998, Ibeabuchi was soon in trouble again. This time, he was at his home in Gilbert, Ariz., when he placed a phone call requesting an "out-call dancer."


    The dancer arrived, but Ibeabuchi was apparently expecting a more intimate form entertainment than what the dancer was offering.


    Enraged, Ibeabuchi allegedly sexually assaulted the dancer.


    A little more than one month later, essentially the same crime happened, only this time the locale was Las Vegas' Treasure Island Hotel and Casino.


    A dancer was called for, she arrived, and Ibeabuchi and the dancer disputed the nature of her services. Ibeabuchi racked up his second alleged sexual assault case.


    Through it all, Ibeabuchi continued to box. He knocked out Everton Davis on Sept. 4, 1998, and the then-undefeated Chris Byrd on March 20, 1999.


    The Byrd fight may wind up being Ibeabuchi's last. A third assault charge arose from an incident at The Mirage, in which the dispute with the dancer centered on the form of payment.


    Ibeabuchi believed he could pay the dancer by using a check; the dancer insisted on cash. Police had to use pepper spray to subdue Ibeabuchi.


    Ibeabuchi was granted bail and spent the remainder of 1999 training at his Arizona home.


    Eventually, Ibeabuchi's past caught up with him. The earlier Arizona charges surfaced, and Ibeabuchi was jailed in January 2000. That detention eventually degenerated into a hot debate about his sanity.


    Ibeabuchi, who has been diagnosed with bipolar and schizo-effective disorders, remained jailed until April 2000, when he was sent to Lakes Crossing in Sparks, Nev., for mentally ill offenders. Authorities initially placed Ibeabuchi there to determine whether he was competent to stand trial. State doctors said he could be made competent with medication. But Ibeabuchi refused voluntary medication because it could cause motor-skill problems and damage his boxing career.


    In a split decision, two of the three doctors determined that Ibeabuchi was competent to stand trial.


    But, instead of going to trial, Ibeabuchi awaits his sentencing at the end of next month.


    On November 8, Ibeabuchi pleaded guilty to battery with intent to commit a crime and attempted sexual assault. Under the plea bargain, Ibeabuchi did not admit guilt but conceded that the State of Nevada had enough evidence to convict him. Under the plea agreement, a charge of battery of a corrections officer, related to the 1999 incident at the The Mirage, was dismissed.


    Defense attorney Catherine Woolf told Court TV that the plea agreement could give Ibeabuchi a chance to continue his boxing career at a relatively young age.


    "He was afraid that if he actually went to trial, he would have a hard time convincing the jury of his innocence and he would spend a long time in jail," Woolf said.


    The prosecution was surprised by Ibeabuchi's plea.


    "He had never indicated any interest in making a deal close to anything we'd consider," said Clark County (Nev.) Prosecutor Mary Holthus.


    On December 27, Ibeabuchi will be sentenced to five to 30 years in prison, with credit for already serving 27 months. Woolf said that Ibeabuchi could be eligible for parole in another 31 months, when he is 32 years old. If he had stood trial and been convicted, Ibeabuchi could have spent the rest of his life in prison.


    And while Ibeabuchi's intimates are eager to testify about the boxer's gentle nature, it doesn't take much for them to describe another side of the boxer's personality.


    "I'd be less than forthright if I told you I didn't, at times, consider him to be somewhat dangerous," said Cedric Kushner, Ibeabuchi's former promoter. "Ike was my pal. He was a low-key spiritual man outside of the ring. Forget about what he did for me commercially. I am just upset with how he let me down, how he let his mom down, and most importantly, how he let himself down."