PC case fans

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by justbill_redux, Mar 9, 2006.

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  1. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    I do and I am too. I go back to the days of IBM old iron the 360/370s, worked on the 1st IBM office PCs that had single sided 5.4 floppy drives and a whooping 64K worth of memory not to mention MTSTs and Mag Cards that had planar boards. No argument that static electric can fuck a system up which is why I use a static wrist strap when I have to do shit like swap out case fans. And when I vacuum I have a special kit thats made for computers whose end nozzles are made out of plastic.

    No doubt we could swap stories on the earlier desk air cleaners/ionizers that when placed to close to the PC would cause all sort of weird problems.
  2. genius

    genius

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    Trust me on this - I'm an expert in this subject (yawn). Static problems are insidious because there is hardly ever a large crackling spark and nothing goes Kaboom! when the damage happens. CMOS and MOS components (your computer is full of them) are easy damaged by static voltages that can be generated from the air rushing over a vacuum clearers hose (think of rubbing a balloon against your wool shirt and see how it picks up lint due to static electricity - high voltage but low energy, so you don't feel any shock. In the early days of electronic manufacturing with these parts it was not uncommon to have 20% of product returned because of premature failure due to static elctricity damage (If you're lucky the part is defective right way - if not lucky part of the component gets weakened which overloads the remainder causing premature failure.)
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2006
  3. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    Initially I thought about doing that, figure the lower RPM (less noise) would be offset by the larger blades, unfortunately the only place I could have mounted that, was the back air outtake vent below the power supply. Problem was the additional real estate about 1 inch that a adapter would add put it right on top of the CPU fan fins and I was concerned that it might rattle and affect the airflow of the CPU. So it was 80mm.
  4. vorhaut

    vorhaut

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    I switched to larger fans... run slower and quieter, but move more air. Use 60-80mm and 80-120mm adapters. The front case fan could be a problem, but CPU and rear fans work nicely.
  5. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    Have to tell you that those old warhorses never seem to quit, more then likely because more components were USA built. I agree about the life cycle on the BB fans and as you stated just got a bad batch. I should clarify that I vacuum the intake and outtake fan grills once a month, inside maybe twice a year, mostly to manage the dirt buildup on the Zalman CPU fan cooling fins.. BTW never had a problem with static.
  6. genius

    genius

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    FYI - I have a couple of old computers (as in 15 years old) that I use for certain specialized functions. They have been running 24/7 for 15 years (monitors are off except when I need to see something), have never been cleaned out. Of the more modern office computers the only ones that had fan failures had sleeve bearings. You just had one with a factory defect (IMHO) as it should last just about forever. Also, sometimes the only difference between a $10 part and a $8 part is just $2 especially if it is made in China. But a ball bearing fan should last an order of magnitude longer than a sleeve type (all other things being equal).

    PS. not a good idea to open the thing once a month to vacuum it out. If you do insist, at least wait for humid days (less static electricity). You can cause more problems than some dust is worth. Think about blowing the dust off with canned gas (10 bucks for 3-10oz cans at BJ's).
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2006
  7. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    When I built my PC 2 years ago I spared no expense on the components and used ball bearing type case fans, because they had a long MTBF rate and were quieter then sleeve type. FYI when I took the fan grills and filter off there was plenty of dirt around the blades and motor assembly, despite the fact I vacuum the thing once a month.
  8. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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  9. genius

    genius

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    The main factor affecting fan life is whether the motor bearings are sleave or ball type. I would guess that the one you replaced was a sleave type and the replacement is a ball bearing type.
  10. Ozzy

    Ozzy

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    I heard the Bush administration was keeping those fans noisy just to annoy you and other liberals and keep you from starting more threads on whore boards.
  11. justbill_redux

    justbill_redux King Missile

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    Dont know how many guys build or maintain their own PCs or even care about the subject but recently I had to change my 80mm cooling case fans, 1 out of 4 went dead on me and 2 were very noisy. So I shopped around found some fans, installed them last night and have to give them a big thumbs up for being very quiet. Highly recommended. Look for NEXUS 80MM REAL SILENT CASE FAN.